Georgetown Center for Children and Families

The Georgetown University Center for Children and Families (CCF) is an independent, nonpartisan policy and research center whose mission is to expand and improve health coverage for America's children and families. The Center’s work includes conducting policy analysis and research, developing strategies, recommending solutions, and providing a forum for advocates and stakeholders to share information and develop policy solutions. See below for more information about recent activities, accomplishments, and advocacy work and tools!

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  • CCF Updates Brief on Waiting Periods for Children

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families updated a policy brief on CHIP waiting periods for children who were previously insured. The brief found that 20 states eliminated their waiting periods and 7 states lowered their waiting periods to 90 days or less as a result of ACA-related regulations. The policy brief highlights the impact of waiting periods on health coverage, costs, and administrative efficiencies.   

  • KidsWell Partners Issue Alert About Healthcare.gov Incorrectly Calculating Household Income

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    CCF, NHeLP: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families, the National Health Law Program, and the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, issued an alert that Healthcare.gov has been incorrectly counting social security income for tax dependents. The brief notes that under federal rules, the social security income of children and other tax dependents only counts if the dependent is required to file a tax return, but that Healthcare.gov has been counting it even if the dependent is not required to file taxes.  

  • KidsWell Partners Respond to MACPAC Request on Future of Children’s Health Coverage

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    CCF, CDF, First Focus, NHeLP, CA: 49 groups, including KidsWell Partners Children’s Defense Fund, The Children’s Partnership, First Focus, the Georgetown University Center for Children and Families, and the National Health Law Program, responded to a MACPAC request about how to improve Marketplace coverage for children. The letter advocates for the Commission to recognize the foundational role of Medicaid and CHIP and discusses: affordability of coverage; adequacy of covered benefits; network adequacy; and transitions between Medicaid, CHIP, Marketplaces, and employer sponsored insurance.

  • CCF Publishes Policy Brief on Medicaid Expansion Enrollment Conflicts

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families published a policy brief on the enrollment conflicts facing states that are, or are considering, expanding their Medicaid programs. The brief discusses the issues that arise when those who are already enrolled in coverage through a State Based Marketplace or Federally Facilitated Marketplace become newly eligible for Medicaid coverage.

  • CCF Publishes Brief on Children’s Health Coverage in Florida

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families published an issue brief on the state of children’s health coverage in Florida. The brief shows that although the rate of uninsured children in Florida has been decreasing over the last five years, it is still much higher than most of the nation at 11.1%. The brief discusses recent enrollment trends and explores the potential impact of the ACA, CHIP funding renewal, and Medicaid expansion on coverage.

  • CCF to Host State Partner Call on Midterm Election Impact on 2015 Policy Agenda

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    CCF, First Focus: The Georgetown Center on Children and Families (CCF) will discuss the impact of the midterm elections on the 2015 policy agenda on a State Partner call November 18th. Bruce Lesley, president of First Focus, and Edwin Park, vice president of health policy for the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, will join CCF’s executive director Joan Alker on the call.

  • CCF Publishes Brief on Renewing Coverage in the FFM

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center on Children and Families published an issue brief that outlines the Federally Facilitated Marketplace’s renewal process. The brief notes that although most consumers can be auto-renewed in the same QHP without taking action, current enrollees are strongly encouraged to update their financial assistance eligibility information and review available QHPs during the 2015 Open Enrollment Period.

  • KidsWell Partners Submit Comments on Arkansas Private Option

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    CCF, NHeLP: KidsWell partners, the Georgetown Center on Children and Families (CCF) and the National Health Law Program, joined 13 other national and state organizations in submitting comments to CMS regarding the Arkansas Medicaid 1115 Waiver, the “Private Option.” The comments expressed concern about the impact  premiums and co-payments will have on consumers and urged  CMS to deny the request to waive the non-emergency transportation benefit. CCF also blogged about the comments.

  • CCF Studies ACA’s Impact on Children’s Health Coverage

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families and the Urban Institute released a study that found the ACA did not have a statistically significant impact on the national rate of uninsured children, but children’s uninsured rates remain at historical lows. The study also found that a majority of uninsured children appear to be eligible for Medicaid or CHIP but are not enrolled, and uninsured children are more likely to have access issues and unmet health needs.

  • CCF to Host Webinar on Coverage Rates for Children and Families

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF) will host a webinar on September 9th on how parents and children have been impacted by health reform. The webinar will focus on the reports from CCF and the Urban Institute on coverage rates, which are scheduled to be released on the same day. Registration is available now.

  • CCF Published Report on Children’s Health Coverage

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Family (CCF) published a report analyzing data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey to assess the national children’s health coverage landscape.  According to the report: the number of uninsured children in the U.S. continues to decline, but children are covered at higher rates than adults; 15 states have higher rates of uninsured children than the national average; children who reside in southern and western states are more likely to be uninsured; and children of Latino descent are disproportionately uninsured. 

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