Georgetown Center for Children and Families

The Georgetown University Center for Children and Families (CCF) is an independent, nonpartisan policy and research center whose mission is to expand and improve health coverage for America's children and families. The Center’s work includes conducting policy analysis and research, developing strategies, recommending solutions, and providing a forum for advocates and stakeholders to share information and develop policy solutions. See below for more information about recent activities, accomplishments, and advocacy work and tools!

Eligibility & Enrollment

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  • By the Numbers! TCP Blogs about California’s Eligibility and Enrollment Data Reporting

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    CA: Kristen Golden Testa, director for The Children’s Partnership, wrote a guest blog for the Georgetown Center for Children and Families’ Say Ahhh! blog about California’s data reporting on Medi-Cal and marketplace eligibility and enrollment.  KidsWell CA advocates are also providing input to state agencies on additional data elements for future reporting.  
  • CCF To Host Call on Medicaid and CHIP Renewals

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families will host a State Partner call on April 22, 2014 to discuss Medicaid and CHIP renewals.  The call will review the required administrative renewal processes and discuss the requirement that children who lose Medicaid eligibility at renewal as a result of the MAGI conversion receive a one-year coverage extension.
  • CCF and Kaiser Family Foundation Published a Report on Medicaid Eligibility and Enrollment

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF), in partnership with the Kaiser Family Foundation, published a report on state Medicaid eligibility and enrollment policies that will go into effect on January 1, 2014. The 50 state analysis reviews states’ progress toward implementing: a single streamlined application model; an integrated technology system between Medicaid agencies and Marketplaces; and a new eligibility verification plan. The report also tracks the five federal enrollment strategies as states transition to new eligibility and enrollment processes.

  • CCF Published a Blog Commenting on High Medicaid Enrollment

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF) published a blog post in response to a Washington Post article highlighting Medicaid enrollment numbers are higher than enrollment in private plans through the Marketplaces. Joan Alker, CCF Executive Director, argues that “comparing Medicaid enrollment to Exchange enrollment at this point in time is not even close to an apples-to-apples comparison.” According to Alker, Medicaid enrollment has been accomplished through streamlined application strategies and because Medicaid beneficiaries, unlike those enrolling through a Marketplace, do not have to pay a premium.
  • CCF Published Post on Final Medicaid, CHIP, and Exchange Rule, Highlighting Income Verification Requirement

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    CCF: Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF) Say Ahhh! Blog published a post regarding the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS) final rule on Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and Exchanges. The blog notes that four of the eight priority issues identified in CCF’s comments on the proposed rule were addressed in the final rule. CCF was pleased to see HHS is working with states to identify alternative strategies if states are not ready to implement a single streamlined application by open enrollment on October 1st CCF also was glad that the final rule formalized a new certification application counselor program for Medicaid and CHIP, strengthened the cost-effective test, and reaffirmed that participation in premium assistance is voluntary. However, CCF noted that HHS missed an opportunity to eliminate CHIP waiting periods and hopes that HHS will release additional final regulations on this and other issues not addressed in the final rule, including: first year coverage for infants, coverage for former foster children up to age 26, simplification of paper based-documentation of citizenship verification, and a more comprehensive definition of “lawfully present.”

    CCF also published a blog post explaining the final rule’s income verification language  that was misinterpreted by the media. CCF confirmed that all Exchanges will be required to verify applicants’ reported income to confirm their eligibility for insurance affordability programs. However, if the applicant’s reported income is significantly lower than what is reported in their tax return and if no additional electronic sources of income data are available to confirm the reported amount, State-based Exchanges have the option in 2014 to accept the income level reported by the applicant. If the State-based Exchange elects to use this option it must implement random sampling of applicants to ensure that relying on applicant’s attested income is reliable.
  • Tech Tuesday! CCF Released Blog Series on Eligibility and Enrollment Systems

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families’ Say Ahhh! Blog published a new blog series – Tech Tuesday – focusing on how technology can transform Medicaid andCHIP eligibility and enrollment systems. The series will be used as an educational forum on how eligibility and enrollment systems, with entries planned to address state verification plans and data sources, the federal data services hub, and the top consumer issues in new eligibility systems.  The blog will serve as a resource for health policy stakeholders and advocates looking to understand how the new eligibility and enrollment systems will work in their states and be affected by Exchanges and Medicaid Expansion. Guest bloggers are also invited to share their experiences during the series.
  • CCF Praised HHS for New Model Applications for Health Care Coverage

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF) praised the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for the new model applications for individuals and families to apply for health care coverage on their Say Ahhh! blog. CCF wrote that “the new models represent a major step forward – they are much shorter, crisper and easier to fill out than the draft versions that were released in January of this year.”
  • CCF Submits Comments to HHS on Medicaid/CHIP/Exchange Proposed Rule and Explains the Essential Health Benefit Final Rule

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families published a blog post on their Say Ahhh! Blog providing a breakdown of their comments submitted to HHS’s Medicaid, CHIP and Exchange proposed rule released on January 22nd.  CCF’s comments included: developing a contingency plan for states who are not ready by October 1st; eliminating CHIP waiting periods; retaining and improving the certified application counselors program instead of developing a new program; ensuring that newborns of women covered by Medicaid and CHIP are automatically enrolled for coverage; providing former foster care children with coverage up to age 26; strengthening proposed simplifications to paper-based documentation of citizenship; adopting a more inclusive definition of "lawfully present"; and clarifying that the cost-effectiveness test for premium assistance includes the cost of cost-sharing protections. In addition CCF also submitted comments to HHS on the proposed Single Streamlined Application models and published a blog post providing an overview of the Essential Health Benefits Final Rule.
  • Advocates Say No to Waiting Periods! First Focus, CCF and California Grantees Sent Comments to HHS on CHIP Waiting Periods in the Proposed Rule

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    First Focus, CCF & CA: First Focus, CCF, and The Children’s Partnership, in collaboration with various other organizations, submitted comments to HHS on the CHIP waiting period provision included in the Medicaid and CHIP proposed rule.

     

  • Fix that Family Glitch! First Focus and CCF Were Quoted in Politico on the Family Glitch in the IRS' Minimum Essential Rule

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    First Focus & CCF: First Focus and the Georgetown Center for Children and Families were quoted in Politico regarding IRS’ Minimal Essential Coverage final rule, the "family glitch", and the importance of preserving CHIP.
  • Webinar Alert! GeorgetownCCF Hosted Calls About Employers' Obligations to Offer Coverage and Proposed Medicaid and Exchange Regulations

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF) held a state-partner webinar on January 15th discussing effects on kids and families in the proposed federal rules on employer’s obligation to offer coverage. The webinar also provided an update on state-based Exchanges that received conditional approval for their blueprints and new guidance released by CMS on State Partnership Exchanges.  On February 4th, CCF hosted a state partner call with CMS on Medicaid and Exchange proposed regulations released on January 22nd covering:  structure and options around Medicaid, CHIP and Exchange eligibility notices and appeals; benefits and cost-sharing; streamlining eligibility categories; and standards for certifying application counselors.  In addition, CCF's Say Ahhh! Blog published a post regarding the IRS’s Minimum Essential Coverage final rule. The blog stated that due to the rule including a “family penalty”, hundreds of thousands of children will not be able to access subsides for private health insurance. Jocelyn A. Guyer, Executive Director of CCF, was also quoted in the New York Times stating that the rule “is bad news for Kids”.
  • Get Out Your Calculators, GeorgetownCCF Released New 50-State Data on Eligibility and Enrollment and Info on MAGI Conversation to Help Calculate Family Income

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF) and the Kaiser Family Foundation’s Commission on Medicaid released its annual 50 State survey report that reviewed states’ progress in streamlining eligibility and enrollment policies and improving Medicaid and CHIP eligibility and enrollment systems. Jocelyn Guyer, Deputy Executive Director at CCF, published a post on the Say Ahhh! Blog providing information on HHS’s State Medicaid Director letter discussing conversions of net income standards to a Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) equivalent methodology. 
  • KidsWell Florida and CCF Hosted a Webinar on State Health Care Reform and Implementation Efforts

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    FL: KidsWell Florida, in collaboration with The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF), held a webinar on December 6th to provide an update on Florida's health care reform and implementation efforts. In addition, Florida CHAIN published a blog post highlighting how the Agency for Health Care Administration, Florida’s Medicaid Agency, did not meet the ACA transparency rules when submitting a 1115 waiver seeking changes to the Medically Needy Program.
  • CCF Hosted a Webinar to Launch its Advocate's IT Toolkit

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    CCF: The Georgetown Centers for Children and Families hosted a webinar to launch an “Advocate’s IT Toolkit” that provided background information, key questions on systems’ functions and features, and strategies for advocates to use to ensure that IT systems meet consumer’s needs and promote streamlined simplified access to coverage.
  • CCF Released Report on Children's Coverage Trends in the United States

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    CCF: The Center for Children and Families released a report on children’s coverage trends in the US. The report highlights decreases in uninsured children, finding that efforts to protect children’s eligibility levels in state Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Programs resulted in a decrease in uninsured children from 6.4 million in 2009 to 5.5 million in 2011.
  • CCF Prepared Draft Comments to HHS in Response to the Interim Final Rule Restricting Coverage to Immigrant Young Adults

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    CCF: The Center for Children and Families prepared draft comments to HHS in response to the interim final rule restricting immigrant teenagers and young adults who are eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) from receiving health insurance coverage under the Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan Program (PCIP) of the ACA.
  • CCF Blogged About Family Coverage and the ACA's EHB Provision

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    CCF: The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF) published a blog post featuring a family who had lost employer coverage less than a week prior to expecting the birth of their first child. The blog notes that although COBRA was available to the family, the high-cost premiums to continue their coverage were difficult to meet and did not provide all the services the baby needed. CCF highlights that under the Essential Health Benefits provision in the ACA, insurers will be required to provide services to help families in similar situations
  • CCF Submitted Comments to CMS on Proposed Data Elements for a Single Streamlined Application

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    CCF: CCF also submitted comments to CMS on the proposed data elements for the single streamlined application. CCF recommends that a number of general principles be incorporated as the application is developed and that all program materials and various modes of application are consumer-tested.
  • CCF Issued Comments on the Federally-Facilitated Exchange Guidance

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    The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF) developed a template of child-specific comments to help organizations draft their comments to the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance (CCIIO) on the Federally-facilitated Exchange (FFE) guidance released on May 16, 2012. The template includes specific comments on the following subsections: (1) plan management in a FFE; (2) eligibility for insurance affordability programs and enrollment in the individual market; and (3) stakeholder input. Comments are due to CCIIO by June 18, 2012.
  • CCF Published Report on CHIPRA's Positive Impact on States

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    The Georgetown Center for Children and Families (CCF) published a report, CHIPRA at Work Three Years Later: Shaping State Actions and Connecting Children to Coverage, on how CHIPRA has provided states with additional tools and resources to maintain and improve children’s access to health care. The report notes that while child poverty rates have increased dramatically in recent years, the number of uninsured children has decreased by one million. The Affordable Care Act has played an important role in contributing to the decrease in  uninsured by requiring states to maintain Medicaid and CHIP eligibility and enrollment procedures. CCF also ran an accompanying post on its Say Ahhh! blog.

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